Moodoid

Melody’s Echo Chamber hit the road with a touring band shortly after the completion of their debut album, a collaboration between Melody Prochet and Tame Impala‘s Kevin Parker. Pablo Padovani was recruited as a guitarist in the band, and made a connection with Parker. His own five-piece band, Moodoid, then had their album mixed by Parker in early 2014, and saw the release of their debut, Le Monde MOO, in September.
Le Monde MOO (Translation: the world of MOO) is a Surreal odyssey through an immense richness and density of sound you would not have thought existed in the 21st century, an experience not deterred by French lyrics. Most impressive, however, is Moodoid‘s diverse musical palette. Jazz, progressive rock, rap and RnB are encompassed throughout the album without deteriorating the quality of each song. The brain behind the compositions incorporates these sounds and styles confidently, without overdoing himself or sounding arrogant.
With Padovani’s penchant for the unusual and oriental, Le Monde MOO contains a diversity of sounds and exotic instruments. In an interview with wordfrom, Padovani stated, “In the album, I worked with Gilles Andrieu, who plays saz (a stringed instrument from Turkey) and ud (a stringed instrument from North Africa). There’s also Didier Malherbe from the band Gong who came to play duduk, which is a flute made of wood from apricot tree that makes a totally great sound. To me, it’s a way to have soft and new textures.”

Le Monde MOO sweeps through quiet and unknown atmospheres, dreamy undulations to moments of rhythmic insistence heavily swathed in an 80s style. The listener is then plunged into the band’s signature sound of unraveling melodies and multiple stylistic changes within intensely colorful landscapes far removed from the ordinary world. 
Of the concept of the album, Padovani stated, “The idea of the disc is a path, some kind of initiatory stroll, like in Voltaire’s Candide in which I am the malicious guide who will get the the listener lost… In this world, we can see mountains of whipped cream, plains of loukoums (Arabic pastry), etc… There is a lot of mystery in the lyrics and in the structure of the songs. Thus, I think the listener will make his own effort of imagination.”
Strongly prevalent from Moodoid‘s sound and video clip costumes is an oriental and Surrealist influence. “Surrealism has always been a major source of inspiration. For the strength of the images it provides, for the mystery and fantasy that also inspires me. The music that I write is often very crude and very instinctive. They come from the depths in that way some Surrealist poets I admire also wrote, automatically,” said Padovani.

Shirim

The last time Melody’s Echo Chamber was heard of in the music scene was with the release of her psychedelic “dream album” in 2012, a collaboration with Tame Impala‘s Kevin Parker. 
The Parisian singer-songwriter returned in October 2014 with the release of her new single, Shirim. Written and produced by herself, the song shows a sophisticated refinement to her sound and a stylistic change far from her kaleidoscopic soundscapes.
Beginning with an oriental clarinet and drum solo, reminiscent of Moodoid, the song spins off into groovy R’n’B tinged with rock and electronics. Prochet retains her dreamy vocals but sounds less shy in front of the microphone as she sings a chorus straight out of the 70s. Although the single is Prochet’s own work, the guitar chords bring to mind the simplistic and groovy Daffodils created by the Parker/Ronson collaboration last year.

Of the single, Prochet stated, 

”Shirim’ is very symbolic for me and I hope you enjoy it. I am recording more music now and I will release my second album in 2015. My band and I are very excited to play live again soon!’

A surprising and original change for Prochet, her upcoming album due later this year is to be eagerly anticipated.


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